20080219

Introducing “6S-ful Writing”

a Cool New Feature here at 6S



A 6S Newsletter sent last month mentioned how it’s always interesting to take a peek inside the minds of other writers. In the debut issue of 6S-ful Writing, Angela Pitt, who took part in The First 6S Mash-Up, and Madam Z, whose full catalog is here, graciously open their notebooks for all to see. To view the document, just click the blue “OPEN PUBLICATION” tab above – you’ll be taken inside, where you can turn the pages by clicking the arrows to the left and right of the pages. To view a “full screen” version of the document (which is recommended, and very cool), once inside, just click the little diagonal arrows above the document (located to the left of the little envelope). For a PDF version of the document sent right to your inbox, send Robert McEvily an email at robertmcevily@yahoo.com. Finally, if you like what you see, and you’d like to be included in future issues of 6S-ful Writing, please comment below (by clicking the comments link) and leave your suggestions, ideas, and email address.

6S

Six Sentences wants to know: have you voted for your two favorite Mixed Drinks yet?

5 comments:

Leatherdykeuk said...

Clever little program, though I think I'd prefer the .pdf. Perhaps if I got used to it, though...Hang on. I take it back. Full-screening makes it so much more satisfying. I like the idea of having writers put down their methods of working and would be open to seeing more of them - keep up the great work and that's my six sentence comment done.

katzbox said...

This is great fun...and I am continually amazed at how lengthy some 6S "stories" can be...thanks, Rob, for all you do. (arris);>

Robert McEvily said...

I'm glad to hear this positive feedback. I think this is such a neat little addition to the site.

Linda said...

Tres fun. I love to hear how writers approach the craft. Thanks... And it's nice to see a pic of you, Rob! Peace...

GM said...

What a neat virtual book! It's a wonder no one has thought of that before. I think it adds depth to online writing, even if it's superfluous. Something about the feel of a page turning adds life back into reading.