20080105

Theology of Fate

by Henry Simoni-Wastila

So here I am. Fired Unitarian minister, the “Unitarian” adjective qualifying the substantive “minister” to the point of secularity. But even defrocked, it might mean I’m a senser, a feeler, an opened consciousness to that which is - and not to that which is - covered over by a traditional faith’s all-too-gentle blinders. Churchless, I'm working a job that no one with my education aspires towards, i.e. “adult care,” which, if it has not crossed your fortunate path, means caring for adults so mentally or physically incapacitated they cannot care for themselves. Each day, the seared silence of a man brain-damaged in an accident, and another who has Down’s syndrome, and others, a litany of mind-deadening diagnoses, lacking the personalities aware enough to bear them. I curse my fate, until I see others who cannot understand their fate.

6S

Henry Simoni-Wastila serves a Unitarian Universalist congregation and teaches college courses in philosophy. He has published several articles in philosophy of religion in peer-reviewed journals. He is married to Linda, author of Love Song on the Inner Loop.

5 comments:

austere said...

The last line says it all, so gentle it is.

Linda said...

Nice 6S, man 'o mine. Especially liked 'seared silence' - may I borrow? Peace... and love!

Kim said...

A sophisticated tirade wrapped in a ribbon of humanity. Very clever. Nicely done.

Robin Edgar said...

Do you mind if I asked why you were "fired" as a Unitarian minister? In claiming to be "defrocked" it sounds as though you were not only "fired" by an individual U*U congregation but "defellowshipped" by the UUA`s aptly named Ministerial Fellowship Committee. Is that the case? Just what are the reasons for your "fate" at the hands of U*Us?

If it will make you feel better, I am an "excommunicated" Unitarian in the sense that I have been permanently expelled from the Unitarian Church of Montreal for publicly communicating what UUA President Bill Sinkford once described as my "obviously deep concerns" about U*U injustices, abuses and hypocrisy.

John said...

Poignant.

I think your last sentence would have worked better:

I curse my fate, until I see others who cannot understand theirs.

Best,
--John