20080129

Begging the Question?

by Jack

Sometimes small things drive me crazy, so I'll blow off some steam in six sentences. To all you professional talking heads out there, "BEGS THE QUESTION" IS NOT THE SAME AS "RAISES THE QUESTION." They have entirely different meanings. If something "raises the question," it demands that the question be asked. An argument that "begs the question" is using circular logic (huh?). Go look it up!!!

6S

Jack wants you to look it up.

7 comments:

Louise said...

I love you, Jack.

Leatherdykeuk said...

*laughs*
Well said!

Harry said...

My personal pet peeve with the talking heads is the misuse and mispronunciation of the word literally. As in, and I actually heard this on the news "...literally (pronounced lit tra lee) touching off a firestorm of controversy." And don't get me started on ironic. Or spot on, or went missing, or....Oh Jack, see what you've started!

E.K. Hornbeck said...

Agreed in regard to the ridiculous overuse of literally.

To counteract this, I've started throwing around figuratively whenever I hyperbolize, as in: "I figuratively spent 100 hours in line at the grocery store," or "I figuratively came completely unglued." I'm not sure anyone gets the joke, though.

Madam Z said...

May I join the "Jack Fan Club?" "Small things drive me crazy," too. How about this example: Starting a sentence with "Interestingly..."
That has become ubiquitous lately.

Jp said...

I am completely onboard with you, Jack. I wonder if they think throwing that out makes them sound smart, or if they're just so far divorced from sense that they have no idea that "begs the question" is an actual term for a logical flaw in an argument.

As for the great "literally" debate, I just like to pretend I live in the world they live in. "Bill Clinton literally exploded at the press today..." Good lord! That must have been messy...

Tom said...

My little pet peeve is the sentence initiator "As a matter of fact" which usually means no such thing.
Thanks for starting this cleansing with your six sentences.